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Author Bio

Hakim Mohandas Amani Williams is Associate Professor of Africana Studies, Director of Peace and Justice Studies, faculty affiliate in Education, and advisory council member in International & Global Studies, Public Policy, and Civil War Era Studies at Gettysburg College (Pennsylvania, USA). He is also a lecturer at the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution, Columbia University. He completed his M.A., M.Ed., and Ed.D. at Teachers College, Columbia University in International Educational Development, with foci in philosophy of education and peace education. His research centers on school/structural violence, educational inequities, and youth and community empowerment. He has been developing and piloting a model of decolonial systems praxis.

Maria Jose Bermeo is an Assistant Professor at the School of Education of the Universidad de Los Andes in Bogotá, Colombia. Her research and teaching interests focus on peace and human rights education policy and practice. Drawing on qualitative methods, her current research work examines how education intersects with drug and security policy, and explores the practice of peace and human rights pedagogies in diverse educational settings. She holds an Ed.D. and Ed.M. in Comparative and International Education and an Advanced Certificate in Cooperation and Conflict Resolution from Teachers College, Columbia University, and an M.A. in International Relations from St. Andrews University.

Abstract

This editorial introduction invites a decolonial dialogue between peace education and human rights education so as to recognize and re-envision radical praxes. It begins by framing the similarities between the two subfields and discussing the effects of the critical turn, with special emphasis on critiques of the colonial entanglements of West-enforced peace and hegemonic rights discourses. Underscoring the imperative of decolonization, it concludes with a call for pluriversal rights education as a decolonial successor to peace and human rights education. It also offers a brief overview of the articles included in this special issue and how they each contribute to an ongoing decolonial dialogue.

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