Date of Graduation

Spring 5-17-2018

Document Type

Project

Degree Name

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)

College/School

School of Nursing and Health Professions

Department/Program

Nursing

Program

Family Nurse Practitioner

First Advisor

Dr. Jodie Sandhu, DNP, FNP-C, PA-C, CNL

Second Advisor

Dr. Jo Loomis, DNP, FNP-C, CHSE, CLC, ANLC, NCMP, CNL

Abstract

Background: Health and social disparities affect the quality of life of transgender and gender nonconforming people in a negative manner as opposed to that of their cisgender counterparts (James et al., 2016). Gender discrimination, the lack of medical insurance, and a shortage of culturally competent providers contribute to some of the healthcare barriers in this population. The absence of supportive education for healthcare practitioners for providing culturally sensitive care impacts the transgender and gender nonconforming persons’ desire to seek routine health maintenance due to stigma, which can result in poor health outcomes (Bauer et al., 2009).

Methods: To help fill a gap in transgender communication techniques, a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) student at the University of San Francisco facilitated the assessment, development, implementation, and evaluation of a transgender pronoun education/simulation program for use in various settings, including the following: a health center in San Francisco California, a DNP-level assessment course at the University of San Francisco.

Measures: Evaluations of the toolkit were done pre- and post-training to assess level of knowledge through questions asked in the aggregate. Data on apparent effectiveness and applicability of the Transgender Pronoun Toolkit was collected via a Likert scale during post training.

Summary: Post implementation survey revealed an increase in comfort with using the name/pronoun that a patient asks them to use rather than the one in the chart, 85% reported knowing how to recover from mistakes when addressing a transgender person, and 84% reported knowing the steps that should be taken to resolve questions when a patient appears to be male even though the chart indicates them to be female

Available for download on Thursday, May 13, 2021

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