Date of Graduation

2019

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

College/School

School of Education

Department

Leadership Studies

Program

Organization & Leadership EdD

First Advisor

Darrick Smith

Second Advisor

Genevieve Negron-Gonzales

Third Advisor

Patricia Mitchell

Abstract

After more than 60 years of independence, the legacy of the French presence in Morocco is still palpable in the education system. There are school that offer education that was designed for French citizens living in France or overseas to Moroccan students. Students attending such programs may not be exposed to a curriculum that is relevant to their reality. The present dissertation examines the impact of the continuing French colonial legacy on the Moroccan education system through private schools that have adopted and are accredited to teach the same French curriculum as that taught in France. This study sheds light on the extent of exposure Moroccan students, who are attending these schools, have to components of the civics curriculum and explores the different perspectives civics notions are imparted to this category of students. The study adopted a document analysis method with a quantitative approach, which helped determine the time allocated to students in private schools using the French program and those in the Moroccan public school system. Additionally, the study determined the proportions of students’ exposure to materials in the French or Moroccan systems. More importantly, it qualitatively analyzed how the content of the civics curriculum is presented to the student population, and explores how particular students might receive it. Students attending French accredited programs are less likely to learn about Moroccan issues especially how these issue pertain to Morocco, from what perspective they are provided to students,, how they are contextualized and the nature of the content they receive. Students are exposed to artifacts that are totally foreign to their own reality, yet these artifacts are presented as being part and parcel of students’ identity development process.

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