Date of Graduation

Fall 12-16-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts in International Studies (MAIS)

College/School

College of Arts and Sciences

Department/Program

International Studies

First Advisor

James Zarsadiaz, Ph.D.

Second Advisor

Lucia E. Cantero, Ph.D.

Abstract

For 350 years, the Philippines was colonized by Spain and the United States. The Philippines became a sovereign nation in 1946 yet, fifty years later, colonial teachings continue to oppress Filipinos due to their colonial mentality (CM.) CM is an internalized oppression among Filipinos in which they experience an automatic preference for anything Western—European or U.S. American—and rejection of anything Filipino. Although Filipinos show signs of a CM, there are Filipinos who are challenging CM by engaging in Philippine art. Philippine art is defined as Filipino-made visual art, literature, music, and dance intended to promote Philippine culture. This research project analyzes the Philippine art community and discovers that those involved in the Philippine art community are conscious of how colonialism dictates standards today. They also actively challenge colonial affects by creating and/or supporting artists whom promote Filipino cultures. However, Philippine art’s ability to decrease CM among Filipinos is not evenly accessible among classes.